How To Convert An RV Water Heater To Tankless? Here’s All That You Need.

by Alice Davis

Living in an RV is adventurous and interesting. If you could add a hot water bath with all the other facilities, wouldn’t it be wonderful? If you use a water tank, it will take a lot of time for all the water to get hot, and then you would use it, but if what if you get your desired hot water almost instantly?

For this purpose, you can have a tankless heater; it makes the water hot without using a tank but with the aid of a heat exchanger. As soon as you open the tap, it takes only a few seconds for the tankless heater to increase the temperature of water according to your desire.

Converting RV water heater to tankless is pretty easy if you have a few tools with you. These include screwdrivers, some screws, a drill machine, sealing tapes, and hammers. But if you are unaware of the electrical and water pipeline connections, better call a technician rather than trying it yourself. If you are inexpert, it is liable that you would permanently damage your RV water supply system.

How To Convert An RV Water Heater To Tankless? Here’s All That You Need.
How To Convert An RV Water Heater To Tankless? Here’s All That You Need.

So, before you start the actual work, it is necessary to cut down all the power connections of your RV. It does not mean you would be cutting wires off course. Disconnect the electrical, gasoline, and water connections of your RV. Then you must empty the old water tank. Cleanliness is the key when you are working on the installation of the tankless water heater.

Selecting the right spot

Before you begin the actual installation process, you must select the perfect spot to install the tankless water heater. To choose a spot, there are a few necessary things to consider that either it is feasible to make all the electric and water pipe connections with it. You should also check if the selected spot is secure, i.e., it is not open for dust or rainwater, etc.

Selecting The Right Spot
Selecting The Right Spot

It is advisable to place the new tankless water heater in the place of your old water heating system as the electric and water connections are already present, so you would not need to work hard. You must take measurements of a tankless water heater and then mark the places carefully where exactly you would need to cut a hole in the RV.

Removing the old water heater

The next step is to remove the old water heater already installed. While removing it, make sure that you do not damage the old electric connections. Use a screwdriver to get out all the nuts and bolts one by one and then pull out the old water heater from the place. Check for unnecessary and broken wires and pull them out too.

RV Water Heater To Tankless
RV Water Heater To Tankless

Thorough cleaning

The third step is to clean the whole area carefully and completely. Scrape off all the tapes and adhesives used for connecting the old water heater. Remove all the useless and worn-off wires. Clean all the accumulated dirt from the spot.

A thorough cleaning would help you to see the wire placement easily and would provide you with the proper space to apply adhesives and put in a new tankless water heater.

Installation of tankless water heater

The last and final step is the installation of the tankless water heater. Make holes for the new nuts and bolts with the help of a drill machine. But try that you do not make excessive holes, or it would get messier. As all the arrangements have been made, your new tankless water heater is ready to be installed. Place the tankless heater in the space made for it.

Installation Of Tankless Water Heater
Installation Of Tankless Water Heater

Then seal all the empty spaces you see with the help of adhesive or sealing tape. Ensure that the tankless heater is safely in place. Make connections for hot and cold water with the control panel of a tankless heater.

Why would you install a tankless water heater?

There are a few reasons why you would need a tankless water heater.

  • It occupies less space than the traditional tank heater.
  • It heats the water within seconds.
  • It does not store any water, so it is actually a water saver.
  • It is more durable than compared to the ordinary water heater.
  • Its supply is not limited to a single tap or shower only.

About Alice Davis

Alice lives in the City of Long Beach with her husband, an exceptionally small chihuahua, and 15-pound Maine Coon. Alice got a bachelor of science in biological science from UC Berkeley. Now, she likes writing about a lot of things; including but not limited to technology reviews, science stuff, and anything food-related.

Leave a Reply